man on the moon

Bombscare — Touts

“SO WEIRD!”

Natasha practically shouted in my ear. Classic Tash – she loved to exaggerate her response to everything, ramp up the enthusiasm levels and really affirm everything she was told. It developed during her ‘my-parents-are-divorced’ phase; she’d come in to school pumped for registration, the ubiquitous American Beauty rip-off art projects suddenly became ‘inspirational’, and the canteen sticky rice and brown beef sludge was like her last frickin’ meal. These things ALL sucked, so I figured she was used to pepping up her mom when dad was out banging the chubby girl from the pizza place on Greenberg Ave, and eventually it just filtered into being part of her personality. After twelve years it still bugged me, but it was often cute as heck so I always let it slide.

“I mean it’s like he’s waving RIGHT AT YOU?!”

The man she was talking about wasn’t real. And there was no way he was waving at me. But she was right, it did look like he was. He had popped up in the middle of my macbook desktop four days ago; it was the autumn mountain range one, white-capped grey stone peppered with brown and dark green bushes that blended into yellow orange red flame fir trees, reflected in a glass mirror lake.

“How SPOOKY!!” Tash yelled.

“Alright Tash reign it in – I’m only showing you because I wanted to show someone before it went away again, and Miller isn’t picking up his cell.”

“No but seriously – that is FREAKY! How are you doing it?”

“I’m not!”

I sensed her fold her arms over my shoulder.

“Seriously!”

“Well… what did you do?”

“Nothing, I swear. I just booted it up the other day and then suddenly there was this tiny guy in the picture.”

“Did you google it?”

I held back the eye roll. She was a sweetheart but at times she could be a dumb blonde.

“Yes, Tash, it’s 2018. I googled it straight away but I can’t find anything. Here, look -” I pull up Google – “there’s nothing. See? I only found results on troubleshooting frozen desktops and shit.”

“Did you change it?”

“No – well not before – but I swapped it to a different one, and – here, let me show you -”

I went into System Preferences and changed the background to another of the pre-selected desktops – a close up of the moon surface. As soon as it changed I tapped the bottom left crater.

“WHAT! How is he in that one too?”

“Right? And – look -” I point my finger at the crater and with my other hand switch back to the mountain range. The man is back in the trees, almost an inch to the right of the crater.

“Oh my GOD he MOVES??”

“Yeah… and Tash, I swear it isn’t me – like, it’s not a trick, I just have a tiny man stuck in my laptop.”

I switch to a safari backdrop. The man was now in the far right, peering through the tall grass and reeds. I hadn’t actually clicked on this one before; it was light and airy, removing the shadows that obscured his features in the others. You could now tell he was wearing a black tracksuit top, zipped up to his neck. He looked thin – his face was particularly hollow and gaunt. He had a short black fringe and a spiky black moustache; the inky blacks made his skin look even more pale. His limbs seemed gangly and weird – something gleaned on the wrist of his waving hand – a watch?

Tash didn’t say anything. There was an awkward pause for a few seconds. I turned around and she was staring out the window.

“Well?”

“What do you mean ‘well?’ – I’m not an IT expert, maybe you got a virus or something.”

She seemed distracted, her tone was flat. Her body language had shifted; her arms were folded tightly across her chest, her legs were angled toward the door and her shoulders were hunched forward.

“No, I checked – no virus. But Tash I haven’t told you the weirdest thing yet.”

She looked back at me. Her face was kinda pale and her eyes were kinda wide. Her chest was rising and falling faster than before. She looked scared.

“OK – so don’t call me crazy – but, like – I swear he’s getting closer to the screen.”

Tash’s eyes widened.

skiing

Terrible Voices — Cream with a K

sun snow blue board ice powder foam plastic cloud coat orange grey red thick thick puffy and thick keeps warm as pine breeze needles sting fleshy cheeks lips nose withered forehead soggy hair only eyes shielded by yellow plastic tear in bottom left scratches out blurry vision white into grey fluff cotton candy cotton wool cotton gloves tiny globes buzz past fingers curled on rubber rudders flimsy brittle matchstick poles guide flimsy brittle matchstick legs heart racing heart pounding heart bumping pumping thrumping tongue heavy thin air difficult to swallow teeth cracking wooden splints flimsy brittle matchstick pearls chattering chattering chattering

Jason flew off the edge of the cliff. His ski instructor had warned him against taking the Black slope this early – it had only been three months since Les Arcs after all – but he had insisted, and now here he was, flying through the sky with no parachute and just a pair of skis on his feet. It was poetic justice really; the sort of irony that Alanis Morisette would sing about. If his stomach wasn’t freefalling through his cavernous body, he probably would have laughed.

It took almost twenty seconds before he collided with the mountain beneath him. The intensity of the breeze that had stung his lips had increased to feel like tiny knives slicing his pink skin, he gulped for air with tiny fish lips blowing hollow bubbles, his heart was beating at a thousand beats per minute. The skis had stopped him capsizing in the air and so his feet were the first to make contact – the bone of his heel crunched and folded up into his shin, which burst out through his kneecap. The back of his skis were shattered instantly and shards of plastic-coated-wood pierced his buttocks. His tailbone thudded into the snow and the impact compressed every disc in his spine, severing the nerve endings and wiring his jaw shut. His body, limp and crushed, fell forwards and the momentum of his flight rolled him down the snowy gravel into a thick redwood pine tree. The front of his left ski was lodged in his cheek and his left eye socket was filled with blood. Snow fell from the pine tree and birds fluttered into the sky.

Seconds later he woke up and the memory of the pain caused him to scream in agony, it came out as a childish gargle. His head was wet and sticky. He smelt antiseptic, sweat and urine. A bright light blinded his eyes as they opened for the first time. A latex hand grabbed his ankles and he felt the familiar pull of gravity as he was lifted into the air – at least this time he was in a hospital.

ghost story by numbers

Ayelle — Actor

ten twelve trees blow in the wind

night crawls across the sky

Samuel’s hair was jostled by the breeze. It was October and the wind was punctuated by pin pricks of moisture that made his eyes sting. He had been walking through the field for almost an hour and was still yet to find the gate, even though he had followed the instructions to the letter; “Pass through the trees next to the river, walk for a mile with the bushes on your right, when you reach the third oak tree walk left into the field until you reach a silver gate.” He was starting to wonder if he was going mad.

It was only two days prior that he encountered the mysterious visitor who had shared these directions. His mum had gone to work early, as she did every Tuesday, and his dad had only got home an hour ago so was fast asleep in bed. Samuel was sat on the kitchen counter in his underwear, black china tiles carving red indents into the fleshy underside of his pale thighs, when there was a short rat-tat-tat on the front door. Assuming it to be either the newspaper boy, the milkman, or some other delivery typical of village England life, Samuel went to open the door.

He had opened it to find a tall man in a black track suit. Tall was not the correct word to describe him, as the crown of his balding head reached only Samuel’s chin, however his physical features were elongated so that he appeared long and thin. His arm was still held aloft at shoulder height, the bony knuckle curled into a pointed fist, fresh from rat-tat-tatting. When the man had seen Samuel stood on the doorstep, dressed in loose fitting boxers and a thin white vest, his lips had spiked into his gaunt cheeks in a smile. The small black pupils in his yellow eyes had briefly bulged and a pointy tongue moistened his lips.

Samuel struggled to remember how their conversation had gone. The man had started by claiming to need directions, playing the part of an out-of-towner who had got lost on the way to the church for a christening (had he said that? Samuel recalled a church ceremony but now he thought harder he didn’t ever remember the man using the word ‘christening’), before going on to bring up the story of Agatha.

The story of Agatha was a local ghost story. Legend had it that Agatha, a fierce young woman, had discovered her husband en flagrante with the reverend’s daughter. Consumed by vengeance she had sealed the room they were in and set fire to the house, before marching to the church and committing some unspeakable acts. Depending on who was telling the story, this ranged from vandalism of the church and its contents, to the seduction and murder of the reverend, but typically ended in the sudden death of Agatha within the church grounds, where her spirit still roamed to this day. The truth was, in fact, a run of the mill ‘woman scorned’ story, exaggerated by village gossip with just enough salacious details to make it familiar to locals as the story of Agatha. Rather than burn the adulterers alive, the real Agatha of 1782 had instead burned her husband’s wheat harvest, and during the following Sunday sermon she had publicly castigated the reverend for having raised a Godless wretch of a daughter, before taking her own life several weeks later. It was a testament to the lazy imagination and poor writing of the locals that this story was still told today.

The fact that his door guest had heard of the story, but did not know where to find the church, did not strike Samuel as odd straightaway. He’d obliged in local tradition by filling in the blanks in the narrative, adding his own teenage colour when describing Agatha’s revenge, then had given directions to the church, even stepping out of the porch to point out the nearby turning. The man had thanked him and seemed about to leave before turning back and fixing Samuel with a curious stare. His lips had once again curled into a pointed smile before he said:

“Do you want to know how your brother died?”